Tag Archives: Twitter

post-party expression

Now that my favorite composer’s birthday has come and gone, and I personally made an unprecedented amount of hoopla over it, it might be reasonable for me to be suffering a little post-party depression.

Instead I feel happy (and spent–in a good way–I did post four times yesterday–a personal best not soon to be repeated)! Not to mention that I bolted upright at three in the morning with the title for a post I hadn’t yet written–one of the aftereffects of posting daily I suppose–the subconcious mind never stops working.

Just so you know, I am not a one-track train. Besides opera, I am an avid fan of the NBA and was a sports mom for a decade. I love my gardening during growing season, birds, and books–reading them and writing them–and also, keeping it real,  “Dancing with the Stars.” (Per my daughter, I don’t really like DWTS–I merely have settled into the irony of liking it.)

Regarding Mozart‘s birthday, I needed to set aside time to give him his due on this opera blog. And you can say what you want about Twitter and deem it a time suck or a worthless pursuit, but besides #operaplot week, it was a most uplifting day on Twitter yesterday. More than a hundred people joined the #mozartchat list, sharing little known facts about Mozart, quotes about Mozart, and loads of links. Dozens of  links to wonderful pieces of music were shared yesterday–on and off the #mozartchat list.

Yes, a whole echelon of folks managed to communicate meaningfully for a day on Twitter without no mention of Kanye West, Justin Bieber, or Kim Kardachian.

Thanks to everyone (you know who you are) who chimed in with an anecdote, a YouTube clip, the title of a favorite piece, or a bit of Mozart trivia. You made yesterday a fitting and memorable tribute to the late great W. A. Mozart.  Oh, and fun! Fun is good, too.

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Filed under Best of Operatoonity, Classic Opera, Classical Composers, Mozart

fave Mozart works–the Twittersphere has spoken (part one)

In honor of Mozart‘s 255th birthday, folks on Twitter poured forth with favorite compositions. So all day today, I’ll be sharing their picks with you.

The first comes from @proxli, aka Terry Moore, who cited Sinfonia Concerto K. 364 as a favorite.

Here’s a great version featuring Issac Stern(Violin), Pinchas Zukerman(Viola), Zubin Mehta(Conductor), New York Philharmonic Orchestra 1980

First we have part one:

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And part two, since you simply CAN’T stop after hearing part one:

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Wordle I do without you, my opera Tweeps?

Thanks to TweetStats, I was able to create a Tweet Cloud representing my sphere of influence on Twitter. This was all done scientifically, of course, and not through anything I controlled. I merely added my Twitter address, and TweetStats calculated this cloud for me.

What’s amazing to me is that I’d never known anyone who appears in this cloud before 2010. I’ve met every single one of them through Twitter. Every opera company, every non-profit associated with the operasphere, every performer, or opera buff in this cloud, I never knew existed before I began Tweeting. 

Now, thanks to Twitter, I’ve met so many new, interesting and accomplished people and made dozens more contacts within the world of opera.

In the spirit of the season, I want to wish you all a wonderful holiday and let you know how grateful I am to have found you all on Twitter.

Maybe Twitter is really the bluebird of happiness!

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Filed under 21st Century Opera, favorites, Holidays, Opera and social media

W.A. Mozart and Jane Austen

Today on Twitter, in response to yesterday’s post in which I suggested literary counterparts for great opera composers, I got some great feedback on my choice of Kafka as a counterpart for Mozart. 

One Twitterer mentioned that though they are both geniuses, Kafka’s genius is random but Mozart’s music is as precise as math, which I thought was great feedback. 

Jane Austen

Though not everyone agrees with putting  Jane Austen and Mozart on the same continuum, after I read the writer’s ideas on the matter– Austen’s world is about order & decorum, sense vs. sensibility, which ties in w/ Mozart’s math, I thought they were worth posting. The writer also suggested that Mozart parallels Austen in terms of being loved: Mozart festivals, Austen films & books (P&P w/ zombies, etc.). 

So, how about it? Which rings truer to you? Mozart as Kafka or Mozart as Austen. Or is there a better literary counterpart? And why is it so hard to use such a framework as this for W.A. Mozart?

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“best of” countdown #2 – 2010 #operaplot entries for ‘Don G’ sparkle

(first published May 3, 2010)

For opera-involved (-crazed, -cranked, -obsessed, etc.)  individuals, the Twittersphere was crackling with entries last week in #operaplot 2010, or, how to reduce the plot of an entire opera to a Tweet–140 characters including a hashtag and the word #operaplot.      

This brainy battle of the curt, terse, and pithy is organized by Toronto music critic Marcia Adair, aka Miss Mussel, classical music’s champion of the short and sweet.  Since “Operatoonity” wouldn’t  exist in the blogosphere without Mozart’s Don Giovanni–the opera that inspired my novel DEVILED BY DON–with Miss Mussel’s permission, I thought I would share all the entries this year for Don G:      

Don Giovanni (Mozart)
Vankan0 – it 640 de 231 fr 100 tr 91 es 1003. Kill father. Dress up as servant. Seduce farmer girl. Supper with ghost. Go to hell.
Gerrit Theule – A rake’s progression goes from woman to woman to woman to hell. His poor servant, left to explain things, escapes at least.
Gerrit Theule – Three strikes and the Don’s out. The Commendatore wins every time. Except at the beginning. He doesn’t fare so well there
Patrick Swanson – I tell ya, Leporello-life is good. Bangin hot chicks, breakin hearts. Pass the butter. *knock knock* Who’s there? Oh shit.
Paul JZ – The Don’s Hectic Calendar: Seduce. Rape. Duel. Kill. Flirt. Lure. Flee. Regroup. Accuse. Swap. Fool. Invite. Revel. Refuse. BURN!
Paul JZ – “Questo è il fin di chi fa mal!” So, don’t seduce, rape, accuse, fool, desert, lure, beat, or kill, lest you be dragged to hell!
Thos Carpenter – A cautionary tale for serial rapists everywhere: never invite a walking, talking statue from hell to a dinner party.
MMmusing – Cad kills Commendatore. Conquests cataloged, courts country cutie. Cry creates chaos. Cast Commendatore comeback cues comeuppance.
MPR Mike – 1003 in Seville is plenty.
Paul JZ – I’m too sexy for amor—too sexy for Seville. I’m a charmer—I shake my lil tush on the piazza. I’m too sexy for this opera. *burns*
Fabtab – Man leaves Playboy mansion to compete for a virgin; sings a rap so filthy even the Pope digs it.
Oliver JMC – By some miracle, he didn’t experience any burning sensations until after the 1003rd.
Eric Mahlzeit – Cunning Spanish nobleman murders, seduces, serenades, and throws one hell of a dinner party.
Where’s Runnicles – How many? I don’t believe you. Seriously, I made a list. Where do you think you’re dragging me off to and why is it so hot there?
CTMCC – Go to hell Don G says mad woman, sad woman, nearly-bad woman, their menfolk and many many others.
MPR Mike – In which our hero learns that, in Spain, he should have stopped at 1003.
Pattyoboe – He’s made a long list, checked it more than twice. Everyone knows he’s naughty, not nice. Dinner time for Statue & Don.
Otterhouse – Leporello: “Drink wet cement and really get stoned.”
Shevinka – Hi lep, remember that old dude we killed? Well he got me b4 the stds did! give your wife *one* for me :p, see you in hell xx
Lattavanti – No reference from former boss because he went to Hell for killing some chick’s dad. Here’s a list of other gfs—see, he trusted me
Henri Drost – I can’t get no satisfaction tho I’ve tried 2066 times. No no no says Leporello but I’d be damned to decline an invitation.
Le Boyfriend – Kissed the girls and made them cry. Stabbed one’s dad and watched him die. Offered chances to repent, he opted to be Hades sent. Men!      

Aren’t they all fantastic? Which is your favorite?  I  can tell you mine. Drumroll, please . . .      

Henri Drost gets my first-place blue ribbon. I love how he added up all the conquests from Leporello’s “Catalogue Aria.” Very clever!!     

Second place goes to Paul JZ  for the I’m too sexy for amor . . . I’m too sexy for this opera. *burns*

Third place goes to MMmusing  for the totally alliterative entry.  

Honorable mention goes to Pattyoboe for her “Santa Claus is Coming to Town”-inspired Tweet.

Read all of this year’s entries (almost a thousand based on more than 200+ different operas) at The Omniscient Mussel.      

The overall contest winners judged by Jonas Kauffman [were] announced on May 7!

Addendum to original post from The Omniscient Mussel: 

Runners Up as selected by Jonas Kaufmann

Name: Stephen Llewellyn (@LeBoyfriend) Portland, OR, was named a runner-up for his Don G entry.
Tweet: Kissed the girls and made them cry.Stabbed one¹s dad and watched him die. Offered chances to repent,he opted to be Hades sent. Men! [Don Giovanni]

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Filed under 21st Century Opera, Best of Operatoonity, Don Giovanni, favorites