Category Archives: Interviews

Why co-productions? @OperaPhila exec explains

Following the success of Opera Philadelphia’s Turandot–a co-production with several other renowned companies– I thought it would be valuable to reach out to that company to better understand the co-production and why it has become a mainstay of their season.

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David Levy, Opera Philadelphia

Opera Phila’s Vice President of Communications Frank Luzi confirmed that much of what is offered these days at Opera Philadelphia is co-produced. Some shows like Turandot have gone to many cities over many years and other new works like Cold Mountain are co-produced with a few key cities in mind.

Luzi suggested I speak with David Levy, Senior Vice President of Artistic Operations at Opera Philadelphia. Levy oversees the production, music and artistic administration, and operations for the Opera. He has put together numerous co-producing deals during his career. Coincidentally, he was hired the same year David Devan was hired as General Director.

As a bit of background, Levy came to Opera Philadelphia as Director of Production in 2011, following five years in the same position with Kentucky Opera. From 2000 to 2006 he worked at Washington National Opera as Artistic Administration Manager. He received his M.F.A. in Stage Lighting Design from UCLA in 2000. Between 1994 and 1997 he held various stage management, production and design positions with Washington National Opera and his hometown company Opera Theatre of Saint Louis. He received his B.A. in Theater Arts from Duke University in 1994.

Welcome to Operatoonity, Mr. Levy. 

The number of co-productions at Opera Phila has increased in the several years. Was this a strategic decision to move in this direction? The company wanted to strategically partner with other companies and look for other partnerships. Co-productions are partnerships. Opera Phila wanted to contribute new works and create new ways to present current work.

 

Can you contrast a co-production with a rental (or bus and truck show) for Operatoonity readers? There are a number of ways companies can produce opera. We can survey the landscape of productions and, for instance, simply rent a production to then populate with our orchestra, chorus, and regional director. Opera Phila is doing less and less of that. More frequently, we seek to enter into a consortium with another company, to be in from the ground floor.
There is s huge marketplace for presenters. Broadway in Philly is a presenter. Opera Phila is a producing organization. We help develop the production in part if not in whole. We gravitate towards new works that will allow us to have our imprint. We want to trust artists to do their work. There is never an instance when we don’t have input on what goes on our stage. If we are committed to a title, we’ll do it ourselves.

 

How do you select the titles that are ideal for new productions?  Dark Sisters was a co-commission with Gotham Chamber Opera, with whom we shared resources.  
Dark Sisters, a new chamber opera co-production by Opera Phila and Gotham Chamber Opera

Dark Sisters, a new chamber opera co-production by Opera Phila and Gotham Chamber Opera

Cold Mountain was a co-commission with Sante Fe Opera. By using commissioning partners, companies are able to create new works and get the music on the page.  We are continuing to create new works and search for partners.
Opera Phila's five-star production of "Cold Mountain"

Opera Phila’s five-star production of “Cold Mountain”

Turandot is not a new work, but it is not often produced compared to other Puccini operas. Could you outline the process for Turandot becoming a co-production? Turandot is a unique animal. David Devan goes back a long time with an idea to champion Turandot here. Some company has to do it first–initiate, build the show, manage the production. It was pitched in 2008 and then scrapped in 2008.  Eventually, it came around full circle, with Opera Philadelphia connecting with Minnesota Opera [and others]. Within that framework, this production had our imprint: our orchestra, our chorus, our casting, our people, and our conductor.

 

Have you seen the results that you anticipated from these increased co-productions measured by ticket sales, critical acclaim, enhanced artistic value, etc.?  We are seeing growth in a lot of areas. Turandot set a record in terms of single ticket sales revenue. It played to full houses. We learn a lot doing co-productions. They give creative teams a chance to revisit or bring nuance to the show, perhaps bring more to it the second time.

 

How do you find other companies who wish to co-produce? Perhaps this is easier than what one thinks in the digital age? Or is more contacts and networking? This is more about good old fashioned networking. We’ll travel to see something or meet the leadership team and talk about future projects. Opera American hosts an annual conference that serves our industry and is a good connection for networking. All the partners for Turandot came in through good old fashioned networking. As partners, we decided who the directing and design team should be as well as budgets and timelines for production.

 

What does the future hold for your company and co-productions? We hope to find more partners because the time is now. We love to reach out to artists to say let’s figure out a time and place for you to come here. We have basic artistic tenants–to energize artists and audiences, in that order. Christine Goerke wanted to sing Turandot. Missy Mazzoli (Breaking the Waves) wanted to compose.

 

And because this is an Operatoonity interview, Mr. Levy, how about some lightning round questions:
Favorite opera: Salome in St. Louis
Favorite composer: Strauss
Favorite Italian composter: Puccini
Favorite Puccini opera: Act III of La bohème; last act of Otello
Favorite aria: Trio from Der Rosenkavalier
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 Next up for Opera Philadelphia? Rossini’s Tancredi featuring celebrated mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe.

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Filed under 21st Century Opera, Interviews, opera production

Tenor James Valenti returns to Met Opera stage in April

James Valenti

American tenor James Valenti will sing the role of Pinkerton in Met Opera’s ‘Madama Butterfly’ | photo by Dario Acosta

When Operatoonity.com last spoke with American tenor James Valenti, he was learning the tango for The Dream of Valentino, a new production for Minnesota Opera.

James Valenti as Valentino, courtesy of Minnesota Opera | photo 2014 © Michal Daniel

James Valenti as Valentino, courtesy of Minnesota Opera | photo 2014 © Michal Daniel

Now, fresh from portraying the silent film star and marquee idol Rudolph Valentino, James enthusiastically reports that he has mastered the dance that Argentina put on the map. (Let’s hope Valentino comes east soon, so that we, too, can witness his ballroom dancing prowess. If like me, curiosity has gotten the better of you, you can watch James tangoing in this YouTube clip.)

In less than two weeks, he opens in the Metropolitan Opera’s production of Madama Butterfly, which seemed like an ideal opportunity to catch up with him.

Welcome back to Operatoonity.com, James. You’re back in NYC to prepare for singing Lt. Pinkerton for four productions on April 4, 9. 12 & 15.
It’s always exciting being close to home. I get to see a lot of my old friends–my high school friends–and of course my family.

How are you preparing for your imminent Met appearance?
I’ve seen the Minghella production, and I just sang the role for Lyric Opera in Chicago this past fall. In fact I’ve sung the role many times. Of course, every theater has a different way they operate. Sometimes withe European companies, you don’t even get an orchestra rehearsal. I feel as though I have sufficient preparation time prior to that April 4 opening at the Met.

James Valenti in Madama Butterfly, courtesy of Lyric Opera of Chicago | photo by Dan Rest

James Valenti in Madama Butterfly, courtesy of Lyric Opera of Chicago | photo by Dan Rest

How are you different from the young artist who sang Pinkerton in 2008, when you won New York City Opera’s Debut Artist of the Year award?
I certainly feel differently. I have been working on a new dramatic repertoire, singing more lyric-spinto. My voice now takes on new colors. I got to sing Don Carlo and Valentino–Valentino was a milestone in my career, and I really grew a lot. So I am excited to bring my new technique to the role. I have a new way of singing, and I hope that I have a huge success and get invited back for the next ten years.

You sing a great deal of classic opera. Do you prefer more traditional versions or lean toward experimental interpretations?
Definitely more of a traditionalist. However, Anthony Minghella’s production is rather modern, and it works. The little boy character is actually a puppet. Puppeteers wearing black will be onstage manipulating him. This choice was controversial when Minghella first introduced it. But I have to say, it’s a stunning interpretation.

Will you have much down time while you’re in New York?
Certainly, I’ll have enough time to see other performances at the Met when I am not rehearsing or performing. I definitely want to see Werther and Andrea Chénier.

Any other fun things you plan on doing while you’re in the Big Apple?
There’s so much going on here. Great restaurants. I’ll do things in Central Park once it gets a little warmer. I love going to those nice hotel spas. I like to let loose a little, too.

James Valenti casualBesides a good tango, how do you kick up your heels?
My high school friends and I  head to Koreatown for a little karaoke. I like singing stuff from the 80s, like “Living on a Prayer” by Bon Jovi and a lot of Journey hits like “Don’t Stop Believing.” I sing a lot of Billy Joel, too. I love all his music, dating back to his earliest album Cold Spring Harbor.

According to the the performance schedule on your website, you are getting a little break this summer. Any special plans?
I’m taking  a little time off to record my first CD. All Italian and French music that will probably be available around August 1. You’ll definitely be hearing more about that project. But this is the beauty of my life. I’m not married. I don’t have children. I don’t have anything tying me down that keeps me from picking up and going to Europe. I still get to fly by the seat of my pants.

(And, to conclude, an Operatoonity Q&A staple) The Lightning Round

Cheesesteak or Cheesecake? Cheesecake (with ricotta, the Italian way)
Jeans or khakis? Jeans
Sweater or sweatshirt? Sweater
Dogs or cats? Dogs
Spaghetti or lasagne? Lasagne
House of Pizza or House of Cards? House of Cards

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You can  follow James on Twitter @James_Valenti or become his Facebook fan at https://www.facebook.com/jamesvalentitenor, where he regularly posts content and photos from around the world.

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Filed under Golden Operatoonity, Heartstoppers, Interviews, Italian opera, Q&A, tenors

Sunday Best with Stephanie Blythe: America’s Mezzo Meets Operatoonity

album art

Stephanie Blythe recorded a new album of the American songbook, ‘As Long As There Are Songs’

If the United States had an order of chivalry like our friends across the pond, surely mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe would be our Dame Stephanie.

Her Wagner, Verdi, and Handel have been heralded the world around. She is our Olympic Gold Medalist in the international sphere of opera, a champion we celebrate with each new success, and one reason why her newest album As Long as There Are Songs is so exciting.

It is sung entirely in English. A classically trained American artist sings a 19th century American songbook featuring beloved tunes by Ira Gershwin, Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer, and Irving Berlin that builds on the success of her Live from Lincoln Center — Celebration: Stephanie Blythe Meets Kate, a concert of works made famous by Kate Smith that was broadcast on PBS in 2013.

As Miss Blythe explains in a video about making the album, As Long As There Are Songs connects her to her audience in an immediate way unlike singing French songs or German lieder.

What’s also brave and striking about this album is the way it was recorded. Some highly sophisticated technology afforded a sound so personal and intimate, it’s like Miss Blythe is serenading you and you alone in your living room.

The sound is so honest and real and organic, and is a reflection of how we made this disk. The sound of the disk is the perfect reflection of what we we experienced in the moment in the room. ” –Stephanie Blythe, As Long as There Are Songs

A very warm welcome to Operatoonity.com, Miss Blythe. What were your initial thoughts when you learned you wouldn’t have to use close-field microphones or headphones to record this album?
I was thrilled!  As a opera singer who rarely deals with microphones of any kind, the idea of having the recorded sound captured purely from the room acoustic was intriguing and very exciting.  I have trained for many years to project my voice into the theater, so I don’t believe that close-field mics really capture my voice adequately.  This is the very question that opened my first conversation with John Meyer about recording the voice.

Listening to ‘AS LONG AS THERE ARE SONGS” absolutely felt like being in a concert hall with you. Accompanied by piano only, you laid your voice naked on this CD. Did that feel more comfortable, more like what you are used to in performance?
I have been singing recitals with piano for many years, and have sung these songs with Craig Terry for many audiences across the country.  It is always fun and always comes with the feeling that anything could happen in terms of interpretation.  The intimacy of voice and piano is something that has always made me feel very comfortable, and I was really happy that our first recording with the Meyers was voice and piano.

Your voice is in tip-top shape. It’s strong, supple–sterling! You even belt! You switch from head to chest range seamlessly. How did you prepare to sing an album of songs that demanded so much of your instrument?
This style of singing has always come very easily to me- there is something there that I connected to when I was quite young.  It probably has something to do with being the child of a jazz musician and with having taken part in so many musicals growing up.  I have always had a fairly well developed chest voice, which is helpful in the belting department, but the style is something that has always spoken to me.  I am just so thankful to finally have a platform for performing these songs!

How did you choose the songs for the album? Were many of them already in your repertoire?
Several of the songs come from our Kate Smith Show, a tribute that Craig and I have toured around the country.  Many of the other songs were new to both of us, and some were sitting in my dream vault for a long time.  “The Man That Got Away” in particular. I have always loved that song, and I am very grateful to have this opportunity to program it — I will sing for as many years as I have to sing.  It is just that kind of song.  As far as how we chose the songs — they are all pieces for which Craig and I have enormous admiration for their musical construction and for their lyrics.  They all have that timeless quality that is the hallmark of a great work.

Do you have a favorite track? If so, which one(s) and why?
I think that “How Deep Is The Ocean” a particular favorite because I really took a point of view of the song when we first rehearsed it in my home.  My husband and I had just adopted our Boston Terrier, June, and she was about two months old when Craig came to the house to work with me for a few days.  She was very weepy that afternoon, and I just picked her up and sang that song to her, and she calmed right down — singing to that beautiful little face ensured it will always be June’s song to me.

Are there any contemporary songwriters whose hits you’d like to take on in your next album?
There are far too many to name, but I would like to sing some of BIlly Joel’s work — a dream is to do a song recording with him.  He is one of the most important American voices of this or any generation.

Learn more about how they recorded this album:

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Learn more about “as long as there are songs:”
http://meyersound.com/news/2013/steph…

Purchase the album:
http://www.innova.mu/artist/stephanie…
http://www.amazon.com/As-Long-There-A…

Stephanie Blythe:
http://www.opus3artists.com/artists/s…

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Filed under artists, Best of Operatoonity, Golden Operatoonity, Heartstoppers, Interviews, opera and technology, Performers, Recording, Richard Tucker prize winners

San Fran chamber opera offers contemporary double bill this weekend

OP-logo-siteHave you heard of Opera Parallèle? It is a young San Francisco company bringing high level performances of contemporary operas to the Bay Area (at great prices, nonetheless).

According to their website, Opera Parallèle is a professional, nonprofit organization that develops and performs contemporary chamber operas that are internationally acclaimed but rarely performed in the region.

In recent years, the company has expanded, even in a down-turned economy, receiving fabulous reviews such as this notice for their 2011 production of Philip Glass’s Opera, Orphée. The San Francisco Chronicle had this to say about Opera Parallèle:

“a San Francisco company devoted to contemporary chamber opera, scored a full-on triumph over the weekend…ravishing and delicate, haunting and playful, somber and romantic, the production fused story, music and stagecraft into an engrossing evening of music theater.”

Its upcoming double bill performance of Bernstein’s Trouble in Tahiti (see trailer below) and Barber’s A Hand of Bridge will be performed in San Francisco this weekend: April 26-28.

Here to introduce Operatoonity readers to the couple that runs the artistic direction of the company are Artistic Director Nicole Paiement and her husband, Concept Designer/Stage Director Brian Staufenbiel.

photo of Nicole Paiement

Artistic Director Nicole Paiement

Welcome to Operatoonity, Nicole and BrianHow intimate is your venue?  We generally perform at YBCA, which has approximately 700 seats. However, for our upcoming Bernstein/Barber production this weekend, we are excited to be at ZSpace, which only holds around 225. This will bring the audience that much closer to the stage and the performers. The intimate story of both “Trouble in Tahiti” and “A Hand of Bridge” make this the perfect venue.

What excites you about contemporary chamber opera?  The subject matters of most chamber opera will have more of an intimate and direct story line. I am a curious conductor who enjoys the challenges of mounting new works that are either rarely done or even have never been performed. I love the idea of bringing opera into the 21st century and helping redefine the form.

So many things excite us. First, because the orchestration is not as large, singers can sing with an even wider spectrum of colors, without worrying about being heard. You can truly hear pianissimo moments.

A smaller orchestra greatly widens the venue possibility – thus bringing opera to a variety of spaces and audiences to many more venues to see contemporary chamber opera.

photo of brian stauffenbiel

BRIAN STAUFENBIEL
Resident Stage Director, Production Designer

How did you two find each other and decide to found Opera Parallèle? (Okay, that might be two questions.)  I met Brian the first year I moved to California. He sang in some of my performances as a tenor. We quickly realized that we had a similar positive energy and artistic dreams.  I first founded Ensemble Parallèle – which was a broader organization. We focused on contemporary music and collaborative work.

After a few years, I realized that we needed to focus on one area and that contemporary opera was the most attractive form. It combines contemporary music with the narrative form, an important aspect in today’s film and television society and also has endless collaborative possibilities with other art forms.

How do you decide what productions to present? How long is that process, and what does it entail?  We are constantly working on repertoire and have a five year plan that keeps being revised as needed. Repertoire is a key element to a successful company. As we look at scores, we think of many things. Certainly, the quality of the piece is crucial. We also try to diversify our musical selection to enlarge our audience base. This is why we will have ranged from Berg to Glass; Harbison to Golijov.

We think of collaborative possibilities in an opera. With the Golijov this year, we were able to collaborate with the SF Girl’s chorus and Flamenco dancers including choreographer La Tania.

We consider the venue. Many works are venue specific.

We also try to balance between new works and masterworks. Wozzeck in the new chamber reorchestration brought back to life a great masterpiece of the 20th century. Same for Harbison (we commissioned that reorchestration). Golijov is a more recent work and our commission of Gesualdo, Prince of Madness, which will receive a workshop reading this June, brings new work in the repertoire.

We think of American versus works from other countries and try to present a variety of composers. Next year we will do a French opera and an English opera.

We try to bring “premieres” to the area, since SF is such a curious city. Once we identify works, we have some many things to consider before finalizing the choices. Cost is certainly an important one. Number of musicians needed in the pit since there are few venues with sizable pits.

a photo from Harbison's Great Gatsby

Opera Parallèle presented John Harbison’s The Great Gatsby in 2012 | Photo by Rapt

What is the difference between contemporary opera and modern opera?  I think everyone has their own definition of this and I am not sure of the answer.  Contemporary comes from the latin root tempor – tempus, meaning something “of our time”–thus opera of “our time.”

Modern can have the sense that it departs from a more traditional style. Not all contemporary operas are modern, if you think of it this way. There are “modern” operas that are not necessarily contemporary. Wozzeck is a good example.

For me, contemporary opera has a broader possibility of embracing a variety of styles.

Are those who worship classic opera disposed to appreciate the contemporary works produced by Opera Parallèle?  Definitely. Contemporary opera is in many ways a continuation of classic opera. It was not created in a vacuum. Our productions serve the music and the artform as a whole and I think any lover of the arts would enjoy our production.

How did you select “Trouble in Tahiti”? Does it exude the same kind of middle-class dysfunctional ennui as Revolutionary Road? There are definitely similarities between Yates’ novel and Bernstein’s opera. Both speak of the hopeless emptiness of their repetitive lifestyle in suburbia. However, in the opera, there is a feeling of redemption at the end that we certainly do not get in Yates’ book.

We were looking for an opera that would balance our opera in February, Golijov’s Ainadamar.  We wanted something American that would embrace a completely different style that would work well at Z Space.

How did you discover “A Hand of Bridge”? What made you pair it with “Trouble in Tahiti”?  In Barber’s opera, two couples play a hand of bridge, during which each character has a short aria in which he or she expresses their dissatisfaction with life. They are obviously also not happily married. We have cast one of the couple as being Dinah and Sam of “Trouble in Tahiti.” So in this way, Barber’s opera becomes the prologue to a Hand of Bridge – and the epilogue since we will repeat it in the lobby at the end of the evening. The 10 minute opera is brilliantly composed on a libretto by Menotti.  All these wonderful artists from the mid-1950’s come together in one program.

You can definitely hear that the work is a precursor to “West Side Story”? What is it about the score that creates that aha moment with the more familiar work?  When Dinah sings her first aria – “I was standing in a garden,” we hear the great lyricism that Bernstein will later write in West Side Story.  The “train” music when Sam leaves the house to get to his office,  we recognize the great syncopated rhythmic style of Bernstein – so unique and powerful.

As promised, here is the promo video for “Trouble in Tahiti”:

YouTube Preview Image

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Stay In Touch with Opera Parallèle!

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Filed under 21st Century Opera, chamber opera, contemporary opera, Interviews, North American Opera, opera milestones, Q&A

Opera Music Broadcast, a treat for music lovers & resource for opera companies

Opera Music Broadcast.com

Editor’s note: Congratulations to Kelly Rinne and everyone at Opera Music Broadcast for for being recognized as one of the five best opera websites at High50Culture.com. In honor of their accomplishment, here’s a Golden Operatoonity post on the station everyone needs to enjoy–regularly.

Have you tuned into Opera Music Broadcast yet? If you haven’t, you don’t know what you are missing.

Opera Music Broadcast offers all opera, art song, and vocal music via an online format, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Plus they have news, reviews, live webcasts, audio. They stream opera online and offer Internet radio online. You name it. Opera Music Broadcast has it goin’ on.

At this time last week, I was listening live from my computer and headset.  The music was so beautiful–MISSA O REX GLORIAE (for four voices)- I. Kyrie – Westminster Cathedral Choir, James O’Donnell– I had to stop what I was doing and let it wash over me before I could continue my work.

As I write this I am listening to Ruggero Raimondi, Kiri Te Kanawa, etc.; Lorin Maazel: Paris Opera Orchestra & Chorus singing Don Giovanni highlights. Does it get any better than that?

Their tagline is “Music does not have to be understood. It has to be listened to.” — Hermann Scherchen

Kelly Rinne, music director, has kindly agreed to a little Q&A to help Operatoonity readers learn more about what they do. Hello, Kelly. Welcome to Operatoonity.com!

It appears you’ve been broadcasting since 2009. How much time did it require to develop your station prior to that?

Well, our “parent” station is Classical Music Broadcast.com, which debuted in Nov. of 2005 only playing for about 3 hours/day as we tweaked the technology and loaded a LOT of music in. Once that station was solidly up and running 24/7 in 2006, then it became MUCH easier to develop the opera station. One big thing I discovered early on is that the opera listeners are much more passionate and much more actively involved in the music. If they like something, they let me know, and if they don’t like something, I never hear the end of it….(grins).

Even though I say I’m the Music Director, I do take some direction from the listeners. Mostly suggestions – the big thing that helped  was to do a poll before we even launched. There had been another all-vocal Internet station called Viva La Voce, which was entirely subscription based.  I went on forums and newsgroups (this was before Twitter and Facebook were household names) and I asked people. They were bemoaning the loss of VLV, so I decided that a non-subscription based model was the way to go. Offer it to everyone.

Kelly Rinne, music director

So the original poll asked people what types of vocal music did they like? opera, concert song, choral, modern, lieder (fill in the blank). And we developed the original mission statement based on that, plus a dash of my personality.

Even though I’m a lot younger than many of my listeners, I really like historical recordings. I also like modern compositions, which drives everyone nuts. Until I get that one email that says – “Tabula Rasa – holy crap, I’m in love. I…* forgets what she was typing, reverting back to slack-jawed music trance*” and yes, I’m quoting directly.

So the station took about 2 years to develop before we went online.

What’s the best source of referrals and are most people finding you on Twitter?
Google keyword search, hands down. Some Twitter and Facebook, some direct referrals “Hey, I saw your post on XYZ and I’ve been listening”.  Mostly its folks typing in “opera streaming.”

What I notice compared to the CMB listeners is that they listen at very specific times of day. The folks listening to instrumental tend to put it on as “background” and leave it on all day.

Opera fans tend to listen in 2-3 hour blocks, and often send tweets asking for this or that request. I get a LOT of retweets of the playlist — folks who are listening who spread the word to their friends online. Twitter is tough because “opera” as a hashtag has to compete with the browser. (sigh)

One of the Twitterati that I love the most is david_m_wagner — he is a Rutgers law professor who is amazingly erudite about opera, and has a snarky sense of humor. I plan to start running his retweets on the site and in the stream because his commentary is priceless. Funny and educational all at the same time.

How many users do you have, would you like to have?

Not enough, and as many as the server can handle. The majority of listeners are from:

  • United States
  • United Kingdom
  • Canada
  • Germany
  • Australia
  • Italy
  • France
  • Argentina
  • Spain
  • Belgium

How are you able to keep up with an ever-changing landscape of performing arts/music events?
Wow, its tough. The record labels help a LOT — they send me press releases and promo copies. It has been much harder to get opera    companies to do the same. I would love to throw them as much promotion as possible, but with my small number of volunteers it is difficult. HINT to all you opera companies: SEND ME PRESS RELEASES. Opera companies are not nearly as responsive on Twitter as I think they should be – they use it to promote “sort of”, but they do not reach out to the media directly. Yes, you can consider that a hand slap, but a kind one.

Another hint to opera companies – learn how to use a Twitter list, and broadcast to it.

Artist management and artists also contact me directly — this happens MUCH more on the instrumental station than on the opera station. I have a lot of performers on my OMB Twitter and Facebook pages, but they rarely tell anyone that they are performing anywhere. They talk about rehearsing more than performance. Performers should be part of their PR campaign…hint hint hint.

The scope of your project is seems enormous and growing. How many people work behind the scenes to bring this station to its listeners?
Not enough. I wish I could clone myself, or hire a few people, but the station is a long way off from having paid staff. I have less than 10 dedicated volunteers/board members who put in a few hours here and there, updating playlists, the database, (which is CONSTANTLY changing) logging music, writing reviews, sending music, suggestions etc.

What are your greatest needs right now, in terms of the site and or its management?
From a content perspective I would love an opera reviewer or two who could submit regular live performance reviews. and someone to review DVDs. Oh, and time. I don’t do this full time and wish I could. It seems like there is never enough time to implement what I want. Um a grant writer would be phenomenal — The parent station is a 501 3(c) non-profit, and OMB is a dba under that corporation filing. We are eligible for non-profit grants, and I have no one to spearhead that    type of project. (big sigh)

When will you feel as though the site has “arrived,” or are you already there?
I feel that way with the instrumental site, but not quite with Opera Music Broadcast — I definitely have a website facelift in mind. The section that is the daily playlist does not get nearly enough traffic, considering how many questions I get about what we are playing.

What are you most proud of about Opera Music Broadcast?
Last year we started live video webstreaming of opera — every performance we have broadcast has averaged about 60-80,000 viewers, from over 20 countries. In 2012 we will be broadcasting a Werther from the Minnesota Opera with James Valenti and Roxana Constantinescu as the star-crossed lovers Werther and Charlotte. We are in talks with some other US-based opera companies. My goal is to do for the regional companies what the HD broadcasts did for the Met — our station already has the built-in audience through our use of social media. We just need the opera companies to step      up and look to build their audience beyond the physical confines of the opera house. I want Opera Music Broadcast to pick up where PBS is failing the arts community. Less and less fine arts performance programming is played on PBS (and I like PBS, this is not a bash-fest) and that is a disservice to a loyal and growing audience.

Anything else you’d like to tell me?
If I can babble on a little more about the live webstreaming — when we broadcast an Ariadne from the Toledo Opera, the many emails I received all said something very similar which I will paraphrase:  “I/we had NO idea that Toledo had this level of singing. I/we bought tickets for the XYZ performance after seeing the webcast.” And to me, that justified all the hard work that OMB has done over the past 2 years — we made tens of thousands of people aware of a very small opera company that performs with high quality singers and musicianship, and helped them sell tickets. Yea to us.

If the station, whether through 24/7 radio broadcast or live video webcasting convinces 1 to 1 million people to add opera to their musical diet — well then, I might be doing something right.

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You’ll find Opera Music Broadcast online at http://operamusicbroadcast.com, on Twitter @operabcast (where they take requests), and or Like them on Facebook.

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