Category Archives: Contests

Six days left to show me your DON JUAN!

Traveling anywhere festive before August 31, 2012? Or do you already live in a beautiful part of the world?

Take copy of my humorous backstage opera novel DON JUAN IN HANKEY, PA along for fun! You might win big bucks for a few minutes of thinking, arranging, and posing a photograph.

Shoot a digital photo of DON JUAN at your favorite vacation spot this summer. Post it on your Facebook page or as a Twitpic by August 31! Make sure to tag me, Gale Martin, so that I see your photo, or add @Gale_Martin if using Twitter, which I will then post on this page. Or email it to galemartin.writer@gmail.com.

But you better hurry. You only have six days left!

That’s all you have to do to be registered to win a $100 gift card from Amazon.com!

Winner of DON JUAN GETS AROUND! will be announced September 1, 2012!

What should your photo look like? Take a look at some of these fantastic photos submitted by Barbara Bosha (Puerto Rico), Ann Lander (Stafford, England), and Linda Orlomoski (Salem, Massachusetts):

For more photos of DON AROUND TOWN, click here.

All photos submitted for DON JUAN GETS AROUND! will be added to this space after they appear on Facebook or Twitter. Don’t have a Facebook or Twitter account and don’t want one? Feel free to email them to me at galemartin.writer@gmail.com. But make sure you send it by August 31.

Where can I get a print copy, you might ask? From Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble.com or at many independent booksellers. If you live in the States, I’ll gladly ship one to you. Email me for details.

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Filed under 21st Century Opera, Audience participation, Contest, Contests, Opera and humor, Opera and social media

COC’s audition for young artists now welcomes an audience

Sasha Djihanian, soprano, from Montreal, QC

For the first time in the history of the Canadian Opera Company, the final auditions for singers seeking to join the Ensemble Studio training program will be made public as a vocal competition.  In addition to an offer of a coveted position in the 2012/2013 Ensemble Studio, the singers will be competing for one of four cash prizes.

More on each of the ten finalists, all of whom hail from Canada, is available at the COC website.

Over the course of the two-hour competition, each finalist will perform two arias showcasing their vocal technique and range.  The judging panel will deliberate on site and announce the competition winners at the conclusion of the evening’s event.

A limited number of tickets priced at $30 are now on sale for the COC Ensemble Studio Competition, which takes place on Nov. 28, 2011 at 5:30 p.m. in the Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre at the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts.

Cameron McPhail, baritone, from Brandon, MB

Select finalists will be invited to join the 12/13 Ensemble Studio, with the number of offers to be determined by the judging panel.  First, second and third prizes, worth $5,000,$3,000, and $1,500, respectively, will be awarded, in addition to a People’s Choice Award, selected by audience vote, worth $1,500.



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Filed under Contests, North American Opera, Uncategorized, young artists programs

up close and personal with Stephen Llewellyn, aka Operaman, two-time #Operaplot winner

Opera blogger extraordinaire Stephen Llewellyn

Editor’s Note: Opera Bloggers’ Month on Operatoonity would not be complete without this classic repost about Portland Opera’s blogger of record!

It would be absolutely insufficient to call Stephen Llewellyn, aka “Operaman,” merely an opera blogger. Stephen is an Internet luminary, barely contained by the cyber-seams constraining you and me. His posts as the longtime blogger of record for Portland Opera bristle with good humor, unparalleled opera savvy, and compassion. He is the picture of joie de vivre–just look it up in the Glossary of French Expressions Most Americans Butcher,  and you will see his photograph there.

He also happens to be a two-time #Operaplot winner–my hero!–who very graciously gave his hard-won grand prize to a D. C. schoolteacher the first time he won the Twitter competition, which you can read all about here.

In case you are wondering whether you have the talent to compete with the best plotters in #Operaplot 2011, take a look at Stephen’s two prize-winning Tweets:

2009 #Operaplot Grand Prize winner:

There was a young lady called Fricka Who…who…*snore* “Wake up & it’s over.” It’s good, I just wish it were quicka. [The Ring Cycle.  Yep, all of it!]

#Operaplot Honorable Mention:

 Kissed the girls and made them cry. Stabbed one’s dad and watched him die. Offered chances to repent,he opted to be Hades sent. Men! (Don Giovanni) 

So, Stephen! So nice to have you join us. A hearty “Operatoonity” welcome and all that.

Operaman in his younger days

When you began blogging in 2007, how did you get the job? You were a barrister and formerly sang opera. How was it decided you were the Operaman for the job?
I am English and I spent my professional life as a barrister: the whole wig and gown thing.  Think “Rumpole of The Bailey,” but I’m not as good looking as Leo McKern. From 1978 until 1996 I ran my practice from Hong Kong but in 1996, shortly before the hand-over of Hong Kong to the Chinese government I left Asia and settled in Northern California. I had decided that after 32 years, my legal career had run its course, and I had my mind set on drinking a lot of Californian chardonnays and watching birds from my beach house on Bodega Bay. Divorce put the kibosh on those plans, but that’s another story your readers really can do without hearing.

I moved up here to Portland in 2004.  Some friends of mine who had lived here for many years had waxed lyrical to me about it’s sub-tropical climate; Portland is a city, they said, where every garden had a mango tree and the traditional cocktail is the Mai Tai. Like Rick who had gone to Casablanca for the waters, it transpired that I was “mis-informed.”  Portland’s only similarity to the tropics is that it rains all the damn time. And forget Mai Tais — the traditional cocktail here is Double Bastard Ale from the Stone Brewing Company!

One day, the General Director brought the Board of Directors into the room and said, “I want you to meet Stephen Llewellyn. He knows more about opera than anyone else in this building.”  I thought, Um, shouldn’t that person be  you, dude? But I smiled in an aw-shucks kind of way and carried on with what I was doing. A few days later, the Director of Marketing came to me and said they were thinking of trying an experiment with “this new blogging thing” (well, it was new to him!) and would I be interested in scribbling a few words for a week or two.

This week will be my 223rd consecutive weekly blog under the soubriquet Operaman. I left Portland Opera in 2007, but the blogging continues. Somehow they have never got around to firing my ass!

How has your blog grown or changed in past four years, assuming it has? I would like to tell you that during the four and a bit years I have been Operaman, I have grown and matured as a writer and that there is now a witty sophistication to my blog that was not evident originally; a result that only hours of tireless self-editing can successfully produce. Yes, I really would like to be able to tell you that….but it wouldn’t bear a scintilla of truth, which is that from the beginning, Operaman’s Blog has been a mish-mash of gossip from the opera world, personal recollections, and a heavy reliance on YouTube.

How have you changed as a result of your blogging?
Changed? I’ve not. It has been of the utmost importance to me that fame and fortune on a scale you quotidian scribes can only dream of, should not in any way change my inherent narcissism, arrogance and ability to bore the pants off anyone who I can get to listen to my endless recounting of my memories of Benjamin Britten. Speaking of which, did I tell you about that time we were doing Noye’s Fludde and …What?  Another time?  Oh, very well. I would certainly be open to change if I thought there was any room in my life for personal growth or character improvement and, you may believe it or not, people are for ever making suggestions to me on this very topic but somehow those suggestions never manage to quite resonate with me. No, I think I am a very good example of  “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Since you began blogging before Facebook and Twitter caught fire, how has social media impacting your ability to grow the audience for your blog? For opera?
Well, obviously, if, as I am lucky enough to have,  you have a few hundred followers or more on Twitter, then posting a link to my blog each week means that there is a reasonable chance that a decent proportion of those followers will click on the link and take a look. Similarly with Facebook friends.  Both on Facebook and Twitter my friends are nearly all connected with music in one way or another so that helps grow the blog readership. Over four years my readership has increased almost tenfold and we expect to be in double figures before the decade’s out.

Who is your audience for Operaman today? It is no surprise that when Operaman was first sprung on an unsuspecting public, the readership was largely local to Portland and the surrounding area.  Now, I have readers throughout the United States and quite a few in Europe – even some in Australia. I try to see that each week there is something that will appeal to opera lovers whereever they may be.  Obviously, if there is something going on in the opera world in Portland I write about that but, by and large, Portland Opera is pretty good about letting me write about what ever I think will interest  the readers. It need not even be about opera, though I try to see there is some connection there, however tenuous. I think the readership falls into a number of categories: those who are Portland Opera attenders who like to keep in touch, general opera fans, whereever they may be, who like a blog that’s not too heavy on queenly criticism, written by someone who doesn’t think the continuum of opera came to a grinding halt in 1960 when Jussi Björling handed in his dinner pail. And, of course, my Mum — who doesn’t have a computer but likes to read the blog in hard copy when I think to send it to her.

Now, after seven years of living here, like every other long-time resident of the Pacific North West my tailor is The North Face, and I am developing webbed feet. In 2004, I got a job with Portland Opera, in their Patron Services department. I have a long background in opera, so I was delighted to be able to swap the legal milieu for a job in the performing arts. On paper I was really just a telemarketer, selling subscriptions and garnering donations but in reality it was a wonderful job for me.  I got to spend all day chatting with patrons about opera — not just our productions but singers of the past, great recordings, whereever our conversation took us.  And because this translated into great sales figures, I was given very free rein.

Publicity shot for the TV Times in England (June 1971) when Stephen had his own special on BBC2

How has your blogging impacted Portland Opera visibility and audiences?
Let’s not get carried away here. When people hear the words Portland Opera, they think “Ah, a terrific regional opera company that manages to get some first-rate talent!” and not “Oh, they’re the ones who have Operaman!”  That having been said, I think the press ink that Priscilla’s Great Adventure got throughout the United States, did bring Portland Opera to the attention of many people who had never heard of it before.  Do I think it has grown the audience?  I very much doubt it, but I think those who do read Operaman’s Blog as well as attend our performances feel a little closer to the action.  Certainly, that is what they tell me.

Why don’t more companies host a blog the caliber of Portland’s?
Oh, that’s an easy one, Gale.  It’s because writers who manage to combine  the lack of literary talent and depth of ignorance I display on a weekly basis are hard to come by. Most companies are happy to be producing blogs of a much higher calibre than mine.

Believe me, if any of Portland Opera management were ever to read another opera company’s blog my gig would be over in a heart-beat! Fortunately, thus far, I have been able to persuade them that they are on the cutting edge of the social media scene and that we are the only opera company in the land to host a blog.  You and I know different.  I would ask you to keep this to yourself.  I have a really good deal going here!

What are some of your greatest challenges to regular blogging?
Again, let’s not get carried away. ‘Operaman’s Blog’ and ‘greatest challenges’ are not phrases that really belong in the same paragraph, let alone sentence.  Each week I sit at my computer, pull up the notes or links to articles I have gathered over the past seven days and cobble together a few paragraphs.  Recently, I heard Philip Glass talking about Bach. Glass said “I think Bach just wrote what was in his head.  I don’t believe he ever composed anything in his life!”  So, it would seem that JSB and I share this creational technique — just write what’s in your head.  The difference between us is that in my case, it bloody shows! I suspect that, like many bloggers, my biggest challenge is getting people to comment.  I wish there were something I could say or do that would make the readers understand how much better the experience would be if it were a conversation and not the sound of one hand clapping.  I am interested — does your reader ever comment?

Any other intangible perks (besides the wonderful #Operaplot prize story)?
Yes, there is one and I am going to be wholly serious while I tell you what it is. With some regularity, at Portland Opera performances and at the Met HD movie shows, people come up to me with broad smiles and exclaim “Operaman!” and go on to tell me how much they enjoy reading my blog.  That, naturally, is a delightful thing to hear.  But then they will go on to say how a particular blog or a part of the blog, has made them see opera in a different light, or has made them go to listen to an opera they had never before considered – that kind of thing. And then I take a huge pride in knowing that, if in only a limited way, I have done something to increase an individual’s pleasure in an art form I truly love. I am not being flippant when I tell you that moments like that make me feel it is a real privilege for me to have the avenue I do to express that love.

Operaman making pasta and singing 'Ah, mes amis' from La Fille du Regiment. Can't you just hear those nine top C's?

Has blogging helped you realize any personal or professional goals?
If you mean did I grow up saying to myself “One day I want to write largely inconsequential nonsense in exchange for almost no monetary gain,” then, no, not really. Sometimes my blog has realised a personal goal I didn’t know I had.  For instance, just this week a nice lady emailed me saying “I just peaked at your blog…” I emailed back “Seriously? Either a) you meant ‘peeked’ or b) Brava!”  I mean, how many opera blogs are going to give you that kind of bang for your buck? (That was wholly true. You can’t make this stuff up.)

What would be your dream opera experience — work/cast/venue, etc.?
Back in about 1972 I sang in a performance of Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas at Snape Maltings with Janet Baker and the English Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Ben Britten.  I’m not sure that, for me, dream opera experiences get any better than that.

Paul Potts and Rebecca Black in Turandot might run it a close second.

* * *

Follow Stephen on Twitter @leboyfriend and on Facebook. And, of course, you’ll want to check out his blog “Operaman” on the Portland Opera website.



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Filed under Classic Opera, Contests, Interviews, North American Opera, Opera and humor, profiles

my 2011 #operaplot entries

If you aren’t on Twitter, you might not be aware of a cultural tsunami building there (or should that be counter-cultural?), 140 characters at a time, called #Operaplot. The energy and excitement on Twitter are palpable.     

Every #operaplot entrant is accorded 25 tries to grab the judge’s attention with a winning summary of an opera’s plotline in a single Tweet. All entries must be in by midnight this Friday.     

This is my first year actually participating in the contest. I joined Twitter around the time of last year’s contest–too late to enter but not to late to enjoy all the entertaining entries.     

So, here’s all my entries thus far: (There’s 21 one of them below, which means *shudder* I only have FOUR ENTRIES LEFT!!)     

Who stabbed a horny guy with bad breath? Tos-caa! Who mourned her beau and leapt to her death? Tos-caa! #operaplot (Tosca by Puccini)     

You can tell by the way she looked at him they’d been to bed, but their fate was grim. Ah-ah-ee-dah. Buried alive! Buried alive! #operaplot (Aida by Verdi)     

Here’s a story of due donne. Boyfrenzi no trusta, not a lick. So, dey getta 2 mustaches. Duets great but silly plotta make asick. #operaplot (Cosi fan tutte by Mozart)     

I love to die at weddings. And I died after my wedding. I killed the groom. I left the room. I sang of gloom. I met my doom. #operaplot  (Lucia di Lammermoor by Donizetti)      

Isn’t it queer? Aren’t we a pair? You with a knife in your chest. Me with red hair. Send in the clown. Don’t bother. He’s here. #operaplot (Pagliacci by Leoncavallo)     

     

Master? Viper! Hush. Coward! Silence! Daddy? Fool. Monster! Revenge! My Lord? My angel. Beat me. Hisst. Ta-ta-ta-ta. Repent! No! #operaplot (Don Giovanni by Mozart)     

Don O walks with me. Don O talks with me. He tells me I am his own. We share no joy–the silly boy. To think! He’s fully grown! #operaplot (Don Giovanni by Mozart)     

A is 4 Aida and Amneris. I is 4 the temple Isis owns. D is 4 the dungeon for Radames. Locked in A, Aida’s arms, Morir, he moans. #operaplot (Aida by Verdi)     

Fair-haired mare ensnares a herr and his frère. Back in the lair. Stares. Glares. An affair? A temper flares. A rapier. Despair! #operaplot (Pelléas et Mélisande—Debussy)     

Oy vey, Moses! Seeink Yahweh in that schmattah? Take my sport coat—Brooks Brothers—but leave the Rolex. Brink me a tchatchke!  #operaplot (Moses und Aron by Schoenberg)     

Come here, Gilda. Can’t dig your new squeeze, daughter. I may be a hunchback, but I ain’t no drag. Papa’s got a burlap bag. #operaplot (Rigoletto by Verdi)     

Happy Easter. Bite me. #operaplot (Cavalleria rusticana by Mascagni)     

1 rake, 2 acts, 3 soprani, 4 ta’s, 5 padre mio’s, 6 nò’s, 7 classes of conjugal conquests, 8 roles, 9 vile’s, 10 heavenly appeals #operaplot (Don Giovanni by Mozart)     

Madame Butterfly

 

CC – gotta go. bt IL B bac W d roses, d warm n sunny Cson wen d red-breasted robins r bZ nesting, ASAP posbL, my lov – BF #operaplot (Madama Butterfly by Puccini)     

In Seville, this skank I drilled, say “Sit on it and rotate it.” Tried to skate it. It was fated. Set my GPS for hell. Yeah well. #operaplot (Don Giovanni by Mozart)     

*Cough, cough* Darts in the bodice? *wheeze* Fitted waistline? *rasp* Puffed sleeves? *gasp* I can do a lace yoke. *death rattle* #operaplot (La bohème by Puccini)     

Anna Bolena at the Met 2011

 

Anna anna bo banna, marries a fat man-a, Percy kisses her hand-a. Die, Anna! Jane jane bo bane, Anna’s death is your gain, Jane! #operaplot (Anna Bolena by Donizetti)     

A tisket, a tasket. A stout knight in a basket. They tossed him in the River Thames and foxed his fat white ascot. #operaplot (Falstaff by Verdi)     

Prison Break: A new Fox series! Starring Don Florestan as the Spaniard, Leonore disguised as a youth, & Gary Busey as old Rocco. #operaplot (Fidelio by Beethoven)     

And now. The end is near. Dear Fyodor I’ve lost my marbles. Your voice is really high. It’s like a girl’s. Go lift some barbells. #operaplot (Boris Godunov by Mussorgsky)

Countess Adèle. She’s real swell-ah. Break me off a piece of that Countess Adèle. I’ll even don a wimple for a piece of Adèle. #operaplot (Le Comte Ory by Rossini)     

      


 And of course, I’m having a blast reading everyone else’s plots. And that means I’ll be recognizing my favorites on this blog next week, once they are all categorized. So, whaddya think, cats and kittens? Do I have a chance to win with any of these plots?

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Filed under 21st Century Opera, Contests, Opera and humor, Opera and social media

take me out to WNO opera any day! it’s a win-win-win!

For years now, the Pennsylvania Lottery has used the saying, “You Can’t Win if You Don’t Play.” So simple, it’s (almost) eloquent.      

Fact of life. You’ll never complete that slide to second base if you’re afraid to muddy your pants. Similarly, you’ll never win any kind of writing contest if you’re not willing to put your work, yourself, and your (oh *so* delicate) ego out there for public scrutiny from time to time.      

Just to clarify, I do put my writing “out there” regularly, querying agents, editors, and publishers, sometimes receiving a friendly “keep at it,” but more often incurring a) callous rejections b) snarky comments c) downright bitchiness and/or d) all of the above.  Generally, no one knows but them and me whether I’ve succeeded or not in my literary quest unless a snarky agent snarks about me on Twitter (which actually happened).      

masked revelers in Nationals Park

How lucky for me then that the Washington National Opera was sponsoring a really fun-sounding, heart-pounding, low-risk songwriting contest themed around a Simulcast of Verdi’s “Masked Ball” in Nationals Park. All entrants had to do was take one verse of the acclaimed “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” tune and adapt it with creativity and singability, while paying homage to the nature of the event: live opera in a major league ball park on the big screen.      

I had a week’s vacation and figured I’d give it a try. I agreed with this kind of event in principle. A noble idea! Finding corporate underwriters to make the event free for thousands of people (families, too) and holding it in a setting as comfortable as your favorite pair of slippers–lime green slippers with big floppy bunny ears.      

a shot from my video entry

Also, I have a high fun index, so this augured to be several hours of creative engagement–writing, editing, filming, and learning the movie works program on my laptop, for starters. Truth is, I utterly entertained myself by just writing and filming my entry, which I blogged about earlier this month. The making it was enough of a reward, if I’m being honest. And I like major league baseball–especially at Citizens Bank Park.      

So, pleased with myself for following through on a goal and because I liked the end results, I sent my entry sailing through cyberspace to the people at WNO.      

I waited a few days.      

And nice things began to happen. First, WNO posted my video on their website. Then I got an email saying I was one of three finalists in the contest, inviting me to come down to the park to receive my prize during the “7th Aria Stretch.”      

Sunday, September 19 was a breathtakingly beautiful day in the Mid-Atlantic States. Blue skies, wispy clouds, a hint of a breeze. It was a smooth drive to Washington, D.C.  despite being a  home game day for the Redskins. The staff at the park was friendly and upbeat–they had their game faces on–though their game had changed from nine innings to three acts.      

Luca Salsi as Count Anckarström

The picture on the Nationals Park Jumbotron is brilliant. It’s HD to the max. The sound was wonderful–and not so loud you couldn’t talk quietly to the person beside you. The air smelled like fattening, stadium foods. The sun was shining, the beer flowing.      

When the opera began, the singing was glorious–none more so than Tamara Wilson as Amelia. It was so easy to become enraptured in the production, I sort of forgot that the grand prize winner would be announced at the end of Act II and that I was a contender.      

Contest organizers gathered all the finalists in a VIP staging area just before Act II concluded. The reporter from the DC television station picked off the contestants, one by one. After the second and first runners-up were named, I was left standing. I had won first prize. What an honor. A talented singer from WNO’s young artists program along with the TV reporter warbled with me as my lyrics appeared on the Jumbotron.        

Being announced as the Grand Prize Winner

I remember feeling a little shell-shocked, mostly because I was surprised that I’d won–that my little entry was selected by none other than Placido Domingo, WNO’s general director. It was like someone dumped two tons of  glee on top of all the joy and attention participating in this event had already garnered me as a finalist from friends, family, and writing colleagues.       

A crowning touch was having the lyrics I wrote appear on the Jumbotron while everyone sang along–that sealed the specialness of the day for me (just click on the pic for the video). Oh, and I also loved the curtain call when the principals came onstage for their bows wearing Nationals red baseball caps.      

Though WNO has offered “Opera in the Outfield” for three years, this was the first year for the songwriting contest. If they offer it again next year, I have three words for you: Go. For. It.      

All my "booty" from WNO

They are a capable, friendly organization. I think their marketing department could sell sand in the Sahara. The prizes were are fantastic. In addition to the generous Target gift card and VIP tickets to Madama Butterfly, I got a tote bag, T-shirt, screen-printed baseball souvenir, and, of course, crackerjacks. Oh, and a mention in the Washington Post today (I just had to throw that tidbit in there).      

Fun. Glory. Prizes. Win. Win. Win.

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Filed under Best of Operatoonity, Classic Opera, Contests, favorites, Opera Marketing