Category Archives: Classic Opera

AVA’s L’italiana sails despite evening’s perfect storm of challenges

Operatoonity.com reviewL’italiana In Algeri presented by the Academy of Vocal Arts
Composer: Gioachino Rossini; libretto: Angelo Anelli based on his earlier text set by Luigi Mosca
Live performance: Tuesday, November 18, 2014
Goodhart Hall: Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA

The Academy of Vocal Arts (AVA), Philadelphia’s premiere opera training academy, routinely transports nearly every production to the Greater Philadelphia suburbs including the Centennial Hall at The Haverford School. This is a much heralded tradition that operagoers appreciate. It’s a lovely hall and very convenient for suburban opera lovers.

The AVA can’t be faulted that the day the company was scheduled to offer L’italiana In Algeri in Haverford was  frigidly cold for November in Pennsylvania–below freezing all day. They discovered their venue’s heating system was inoperable and had to quickly relocate nearby for that evening’s show.

The cast of L’italiana in Algeri, presented by the Academy of Vocal Arts, 2014

Though the venue was toasty warm, Goodhart Hall at Bryn Mawr College had no orchestra pit, so the entire orchestra had to pile onto the stage for the performance, which left only the proscenium available for performers. Nor could the set from Centennial Hall be readily installed at Goodhart. Lastly, the facility could not accommodate supertitles, so none were offered, at least to those audience members sitting in the balcony, such as this reviewer.

Despite all these challenges, the performers were there to put on a show and perform they did. They seemed unfazed by the musicians behind them, the lack of set around them, and  in the absence of supertitles, every audience member laser-focused on their performances, trying to extract meaning from every note, every gesture, and every facial expression.

I suppose the company had a bit of fortune that all this occurred during a Rossini dramma giocoso. The storyline is a happy marriage of nefarious plotting against a pair of deserving and attractive lovers, which is foiled, of course, so the evening can be all wrapped up in a happy-ending bow.

The Turkish Bey Mustafà is bored with his harem, wants an Italian girl, and, lo and behold, a made-to-order beauty, Isabella, washes up on shore with a band of pirates:

Isabella and the band of shipwrecked pirates

As the much-admired L’italiana, mezzo-soprano Hanna Ludwig delivered a sturdy performance. The role was written for a contralto, and at times, it seemed the lowest notes required fell outside of this mezzo’s comfort range.

Mezzo-soprano Hannah Ludwig as Isabella

She did have a great sense of comic timing, especially with the band of shipwrecked pirates.

As the Italian slave Lindoro, Australian tenor Alasdair Kent had that all important Rossini tenor ping to his voice. His lovelorn affect was endearing. His voice cracked a few times throughout the night,  but his acting and onstage presence were solid.

Tenor Alasdair Kent sang the role of the lovesick Lindoro

Best performance of the evening honors must go to bass-bariton André Courville as the Turkish Bey Mustafà. His powerful voice and spot-on characterization never wavered. He was imperious and comical at the same time. As Mustafà, he appeared completely unfazed by the change of venue, lack of meaningful set, orchestra playing behind him, and clambered onto and off his makeshift throne with aplomb. His scenes with Michael Adams as Isabella’s would-be lover Taddeo were magical. Bravo, Mr. Courville.

From left to right: baritone Michael Adams as Taddeo and bass-baritone André Courville as Mustafà.

Because the ensemble exchanges roles throughout the run of the show–the principals are typically double-cast–the AVA chorus is perpetually excellent and a highlight of any AVA show. And even though the role was smaller, Anush Avetisyan as the discarded wife Elvira and her clear soprano with its bell-like timbre brightened the stage with each entrance.

Alasdair Kent as Lindoro and Anush Avetisyan as Elvira

Costumes by Val Starr were lush and lovely–a sparkling cut above. While the turquoise palette used to represent Algier was so appealing, the portable blocks which seemed to be configured and reconfigured incessantly and nonsensically became distracting. Credit director Dorothy Danner for instilling in her cast a “show-must-go-on” ethos, or perhaps that credit is shared with the AVA faculty.

I was expecting the AVA orchestra to overpower the singers–the number of pieces alone (31!) was foreboding–but was pleasantly surprised by the control that conductor Richard A. Raub exerted over his musicians–their contributions were balanced and beautiful.

Not every company could’ve salvaged a show following a perfect storm of trouble, but they all deserve credit for weathering the unexpected woes. The cast was richly rewarded with applause and cheers at curtain call.

And  should this ever happen again, to the behind-the-scenes folks who did a heroic job notifying subscribers regarding the change of venue, don’t forget that those reviewing the show need to know this information in a timely fashion, too.  No reviewer likes to get a parking ticket just because she tried to make curtain at a dark and unfamiliar venue.

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‘Butterfly’ soars at Glimmerglass

Operatoonity.com review: Madame Butterflypresented by Glimmerglass Festival
Live performance: Tuesday, July 29, 2014
The Alice Busch Opera Theater, Cooperstown, NY
5.0 stars

five stars

The Glimmerglass Festival's 2014 production of Puccini's "Madame Butterfly." Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

The Glimmerglass Festival’s 2014 production of Puccini’s “Madame Butterfly.” Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

Exceedingly beautiful, tender, and elegiac, well executed in every aspect. The new production of Madame Butterfly at the Glimmerglass Festival in Cooperstown is an elegant, extraordinary show that delivers on all the weighty expectations placed on a beloved Puccini work.

It featured an evocative and versatile set and special effects including a shower of pale pink rose petals …

Yunah Lee as Cio-Cio-San in The Glimmerglass Festival's 2014 production of Puccini's "Madame Butterfly." Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

Yunah Lee as Cio-Cio-San in The Glimmerglass Festival’s 2014 production of Puccini’s “Madame Butterfly.” Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

. . . and, later,  a billowing curtain of blood.

Yunah Lee as Cio-Cio-San and Dinyar Vania as Lieutenant B.F. Pinkerton in The Glimmerglass Festival's 2014 production of Puccini's "Madame Butterfly." Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

Yunah Lee as Cio-Cio-San and Dinyar Vania as Lieutenant B.F. Pinkerton in The Glimmerglass Festival’s 2014 production of Puccini’s “Madame Butterfly.” Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

It was a consummate theatrical production under the directorial aegis of the Festival’s Artistic and General Director Francesca Zambello, offering a sweeping saga of the powerful tensions between traditional Eastern and imperialistic Western values and culture as distilled through the single act of abandonment of a sympathetic heroine by a blundering American naval officer that drove many audience members to tears as early as the first act and storming to their feet a standing ovation by curtain call.

Amidst hours of artistry, stunning music, and many spectacular voices, it takes some kind of  special performer portraying Butterfly to soar higher than all others and all the other elements, elevating a production to a transformative operatic experience. As Cio-Cio-San, Korean soprano Yunah Lee sang a Butterfly for the ages, worthy of elegy. Lee conveyed power, beauty, and grace in every note, in every gesture, in every facial expression–a living, breathing symbol of that lovely butterfly whose wings are pinned down by Westerners seeking to preserve and enjoy them by killing them.

Yunah Lee as Cio-Cio-San with members of the ensemble in The Glimmerglass Festival's 2014 production of Puccini's "Madame Butterfly." Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

Yunah Lee as Cio-Cio-San with members of the ensemble in The Glimmerglass Festival’s 2014 production of Puccini’s “Madame Butterfly.” Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

Everything Lee sang was perfection, from the famous Act I love duet with Pinkerton played impressively by American tenor Dinyar Vanya beginning with Bimba, Bimba, non piangere…

Dinyar Vania as Lieutenant B.F. Pinkerton and Yunah Lee as Cio-Cio-San in The Glimmerglass Festival's 2014 production of "Madame Butterfly." Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

Dinyar Vania as Lieutenant B.F. Pinkerton and Yunah Lee as Cio-Cio-San in The Glimmerglass Festival’s 2014 production of “Madame Butterfly.” Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

…to the opera’s most famous aria Un bel dì, delivered flawlessly. Though the audience knows through Suzuki’s reactions that Pinkerton is not coming back to live with her, somehow Lee has made us believe through her powerful rendition that there’s a glimmer of chance of a happy reunion–even if we’ve seen the show before, numerous times.

Kristen Choi as Suzuki and Yunah Lee as Cio-CIo-San in The Glimmerglass Festival's 2014 production of "Madame Butterfly." Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

Kristen Choi as Suzuki and Yunah Lee as Cio-CIo-San in The Glimmerglass Festival’s 2014 production of “Madame Butterfly.” Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

As Suzuki, American mezzo and Young Artists Kristen Choi was first-rate, turning in a nuanced and polished performance beyond her years, totally believable as Butterfly’s loyal maid, who is, if not older, considerably more worldly wise.

And the list of impressive performances continues. As Sharpless, Ukrainian tenor Aleksey Bogdanov sang the role with uncommon depth and sensitivity.  In addition to substantial artistry, Bogdanov has enormous stage presence and intelligence. Each of his warnings to Pinkerton, “Didn’t I tell you to be careful?” rings more urgent than the last because this Sharpless understands the consequences of Pinkerton’s actions even though Pinkerton himself remains clueless until the final scene of the show.

Kristen Choi as Suzuki and Aleksey Bogdanov as Sharpless in The Glimmerglass Festival's 2014 production of Puccini's "Madame Butterfly." Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

Kristen Choi as Suzuki and Aleksey Bogdanov as Sharpless in The Glimmerglass Festival’s 2014 production of Puccini’s “Madame Butterfly.” Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

Tenor Dinyar Vanya was ideally cast as Pinkerton. He has a clear, spinto quality to his voice that one expects of a leading man in a Puccini opera. His infatuation with Butterfly was so believable rendered and his love duet with her to end the first act so beautifully sung, it brought this reviewer to tears.

Dinyar Vania as Lieutenant B.F. Pinkerton in The Glimmerglass Festival's 2014 production of "Madame Butterfly." Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

Dinyar Vania as Lieutenant B.F. Pinkerton in The Glimmerglass Festival’s 2014 production of “Madame Butterfly.” Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

Though not a singing role, special mention must go to little Louis McKinny, as Sorrow, Butterfly and Pinkerton’s three-year-old son. Somehow, this adorable child understood how critical his role is to the success of the production. He executed his stage directions perfectly, comforting his stricken mother, even remembering to innocently play with the toy boat as he marched offstage, just as he was instructed to do.

Yunah Lee as Cio-Cio-San and Louis McKinny as Sorrow in The Glimmerglass Festival's 2014 production of Puccini's "Madame Butterfly." Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

Yunah Lee as Cio-Cio-San and Louis McKinny as Sorrow in The Glimmerglass Festival’s 2014 production of Puccini’s “Madame Butterfly.” Photo: Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival.

The show was conducted by the Festival’s new music director Joseph Calaneri. During the smaller more intimate moments of the show, he conducted his capable musicians as if they were gloved on his hand. But in the initial numbers of the first act, it seemed like both Vania and Bogdanov had to compete with the orchestra to be heard and both have huge voices.

Those who have seen ‘Butterfly’ before might be surprised by the directorial choices in this production. Scenes that have been traditionally set in Cio-Cio San’s village are set in the American Consulate instead. Personally, I found this to be an effective choice in driving home the themes central to the piece, including the intrusion of American military power and influence abroad without an adequate respect for and understanding of foreign peoples and cultures.

Set design was by Michael Yergen and lighting by Robert Wierzel.

Set design was by Michael Yergen and lighting by Robert Wierzel.

So yes, this production offers a different artistic approach, but a winning one, and the work of all involved from the sometimes ethereal-as-butterfly-wings scrims and fly pieces designed by Michael Yeargan to the period costumes by Anna Yavich to the lighting by Robert Wierzel all combined synergistically to splendid effect.

It is an original version and yet one that lifts up the music and conventions of Madame Butterfly painstakingly inserted by the composer and the original librettists that begs to be seen.  There are six more performances of Madame Butterfly at Glimmerglass Festival through August 23. Don’t miss it.

* * *

Every mainstage performance is preceded by a Show Talk beginning one hour before curtain. The Show Talk for Butterfly was given by Director Francesca Zambella and is a wonderful add-on that will enrich your Glimmerglass Festival experience.

 

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AVA’s Manon is playful, pretty, and purposeful

Operatoonity.com review: Manon presented by the Academy of Vocal Arts
Live performance: Wednesday, May 7, 2014
Centennial Hall, The Haverford School
4.5 stars

four and a half stars

 

 

Manon, AVA, 2014

Julia Dawson as Javotte and Anush Avetisyan as Poussette | Photo credit Paul Sirochman Photography

Pretty in pink. Playful and sensual. The Academy of Vocal Arts’ (AVA) new production of Manon by Charles Massenet was a sensual, floridly elegant success, owing to purposeful direction by Tito Capobianco and solid execution.

Surely the inspired set design by Peter Harrison, which paid homage to a scandalously famous rococo painting, and the stunning costumes by Val Starr made this the most beautiful production this reviewer has ever seen at the AVA.

Since a work of art suggestive in its time served as a muse for the production team, the show also had an earthy verismo quality to it. While the powdered wigs and brocade ensembles lent the show a Mozartian sensibility,  the passionate clutches and languishing sighs were all Puccini. Verismo Massenet? You had to see it to believe it.

Daniel Noyola Monsieur de Bretigny and Sydney Mancasola as Manon. Photo credit Paul Sirochman Photography

Daniel Noyola as Monsieur de Bretigny and Sydney Mancasola as Manon. Photo credit Paul Sirochman Photography

Manon is a classic “tart-with-a-heart” story that sets the title character on a life journey that is novel-worthy in scope and emotional depth. Her journey is exceedingly hard to capture, even in a five-act opera, though many companies have made an effort to do so. The AVA’s most recent production certainly made a game and valiant go of it.

Sydney Mancasola as Manon in Act I

Sydney Mancasola as Manon in Act I

As Manon, Sydney Mancasola was more believable and sympathetic as the virginal girl headed to a convent whose life is forever altered when she meets La Chevalier Des Grieux and finds love. Sometimes singers are swallowed up by the too-loud AVA orchestra and forced to push too much to be heard, but there was no danger of this happening to Mancasola. Can a singer be too loud? Yes, I believe at times she was. Though there was power and beauty in her singing, she needs to back off those pince-nez shattering high notes at times. She was, however, a delight in the much anticipated Gavotte scene–confident, charming, and vocally arresting.

Diego Silva as Des Grieux and Sydney Mancasola as Manon in the final act . Photo credit Paul Sirochman

Diego Silva as Des Grieux and Sydney Mancasola as Manon in the final act. Photo credit Paul Sirochman

As Chevalier Des Grieux, Mexican tenor Diego Silva turned in a worthy performance. He has an Italianate quality to his singing and also to his onstage affect. Singing this French opera was a bit beyond his reach though he had many shining moments that evening and a stage presence that is endearing. Des Grieux also makes a life-altering journey, from love at first sight, to hating Manon for her excess, and then loving her in spite of her shortcomings, which he conveyed with conviction, despite his tender years.

All the men in supporting roles were simply splendid–bass-baritone Daniel Noyola as the scheming Monsieur de Bretigny, baritone Michael Adams as Manon’s cousin Lescaut,  tenor AVA Alumnus Jeffrey Halili ’06 as the opportunistic Guillot Morfontaine, and bass-baritone Musa Ngqungwana as the manipulative Le Comte des Grieux. With all these men consipiring against her, Manon never had a chance for a truly happy life.

Armando Piña, Jessie Nguenang, Daniel Noyola, and Sydney Mancasola. Photo credit Paul Sirochman

Armando Piña, Jessie Nguenang, Daniel Noyola, and Sydney Mancasola. Photo credit Paul Sirochman

It also must be said that the women in the supporting and ensemble roles were delightful–beautiful to see and hear. Brava to Anush Avetisyan as Pousette, Julia Dawson as Javotte, and Alexandra Schenck as Rosette, whose talents and feminine wiles lured Manon to explore her innermost desires for love and luxury. Surely one of the advantages of seeing AVA productions is that the company members not singing leads in the current show comprise the ensemble. Every choral number is a treat.

Alexandra Schenck, Daniel Noyola, Julia Dawson, Anush Avetisyan, and Jeffrey Halili (AVA '06). Photo credit Paul Sirochman Photography

Alexandra Schenck, Daniel Noyola, Julia Dawson, Anush Avetisyan, and Jeffrey Halili (AVA ’06). Photo credit Paul Sirochman Photography

Massenet’s duets are also masterful, but I still miss the precision and impact of Mozart and Verdi in his quartets and quintets, which seem to spill out like unruly, leggy blossoms at the end of the growing season. Perhaps the small group numbers are harder to sing but those parts of the show seemed to be the weakest.

As for Christofer Macatsoris’ conducting, the tempi were perfect–critical in a long work that the score not drag. A little less volume might have helped the singers to rein in their occasional vocal “shouting.”

Overall, a winning production of a beautiful opera in the repertoire, and worthy of the generous ovation accorded them all at the evening’s end.

 

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why is Don Giovanni so hard to do well?

According to a list I found called 100 Greatest Operas, Don Giovanni is listed as #3. According to OperaBase tables, it is also the 10th most frequently performed opera in the world.

While I am not doubting these rankings–the opera certainly pops up in my Fave Five–it is a great curiosity to me why so few companies, well-resourced ones at that–can manage a bang-up presentation of the famous dramma giocoso.

If one takes stock in Michael White’s 2014 review of  the Royal Opera House’s Don Giovanni at Covent Garden, he contends it is within the nature of the production itself that makes it hard to pull off.  It is many things such as comedy, tragedy, sexual assault, murder, masquerade, chase, supernatural interaction. As such, the opera constitutes an “invitation to excess”  for less-disciplined directors.

Confounding the greatest of expectations, the Met’s “new” production (2011) was considered lackluster and underdone by a number of critics, including Tommasini. A quick Google show points to numerous companies who didn’t hit the mark with arguably Mozart’s greatest opera.

Don Giovanni at New York City Opera, 2009 (Christopher Alden, director)

Don Giovanni at New York City Opera, 2009 (Christopher Alden, director)

In my recent review of Opera Phila’s Don Giovanni, I mentioned how much I liked Christopher Alden’s production at New York City Opera in 2009. The New York Times reviewer said Alden revitalized a masterpiece, and I concur.

What I wouldn’t give to see a Don Giovanni like that again! Although, in the interest of full disclosure, during intermission, people complained about the Alden version, that it was too regie. Honestly, I thought it was pure-dead brilliant.

Lacking a truly great performance to attend, in the interim, there are many fine recorded performances to listen to. And I’ll keep hoping to see another Don Giovanni for the ages before I shuffle off my mortal coil. Fingers crossed.

How about you, dear readers? Where have you seen a Don G. for the ages?

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Don G. in Philly gets a “B”

Operatoonity.com review: Don Giovanni presented by Opera Philadelphia
Live performance: April 27, 2014
Academy of Music, Philadelphia, PA
4-stars

 

Elliot Madore as Don Giovanni and Michelle Johnson as Donna Anna in DON  GIOVANNI at the Academy of Music | Photo by Kelly and Massa

Elliot Madore as Don Giovanni and Michelle Johnson as Donna Anna in DON
GIOVANNI at the Academy of Music | Photo by Kelly and Massa

During Opera Philadelphia’s new production of Don Giovanni, the performers made the grade. Unfortunately, the artistic direction pulled down the class average. Performers = A.  Direction = C. Final grade = B.

An opera is without a doubt music and is nothing when the music is wrong. At the same time, opera must be more than music. Though the period costumes shone and the lighting proved atmospheric, the direction was, well, sloppy. It lacked a clear vision, almost as if it didn’t know what kind of production it wanted to be or why.

I’m not anti-regie, not in the least. I’ve seen an experimental version of Don Giovanni directed by Christopher Alden at New York City Opera and adored it. It was twisted and irreverent but exceedingly carefully and consistent in its execution. Though there were bright and beautiful moments in this production, Nicholas Muni’s direction lapsed into the nonsensical at times, particularly in Act II, when the storytelling needs to be crisp and powerful enough to drive the audience to accept Don Giovanni’s horrific demise. For instance, instead of embarking on a manhunt for Don Giovanni, the characters plumbed their innermost feelings. Then the infamous banquet scene took place in a crypt. Since there were numerous details well attended in Act I, the failure to remove the Commendatore’s mausoleum from the stage for the finale simply confounded this reviewer.

Don Giovanni is a great opera that merits greatness. Producing it is a grave responsibility (pun wholly intended). Seriously folks, doing Don G. nearly warrants the creation of a contract with the audience that a company will do no harm. I was quite disturbed through the first scene of Act I because the overture was too leisurely and almost plodding as it lumbered into Leporello’s first stage appearance. If the tortured pace of the overture weren’t enough to dampen expectations, most of the singers struggled to be heard over a too-loud orchestra initially. Though there were rich voices onstage, they were not particularly big ones except for tenor David Portillo, who possessed plenty of ping.

– David Portillo as Don Ottavio and Amanda Majeski as Donna Elvira in DON  GIOVANNI at the Academy of Music | photo by Kelly and Massa

– David Portillo as Don Ottavio and Amanda Majeski as Donna Elvira in DON
GIOVANNI at the Academy of Music | photo by Kelly and Massa

Usually Don Ottavio is sung by a guy my age, well past his prime, with a *very* mature sound and a milquetoast presence. It was, therefore, such a pleasure seeing a young man sing Don Ottavio for a change, one who is believable when he expresses his deeply felt frustration from being denied love and intimacy with his beloved Donna Anna and whose long-suffering adoration is palpable. Portillo’s voice was strong and beautiful and more nuanced than any Don Ottavio I’ve ever heard, earning him an A+ in my book.

Another A+ performance was turned in by lyric soprano Amanda Majeski as Donna Elvira. Her voice has been tauted as possessing a silvery beauty, and indeed it does. The power and beauty of her tone found ample expression as the scorned Elvira and soared above the occasionally too-loud orchestra and lasered itself directly into the audience’s heart. I hope to see her again very soon.

As Donna Anna, soprano Michelle Johnson was warmly received by Philly audiences who have loved her for past performances at Opera Phila and the Academy of Vocal Arts (AVA). Sadly, she almost seemed overwhelmed by the singing required in the role of the woman Don Giovanni seeks to ravage. Johnson lacked the requisite intonation and technique to sing Mozart, seeming way out of her element, despite evocative acting skills.

Nicholas Masters as the ghost of the Commendatore and Elliot Madore as Don  Giovanni in DON GIOVANNI at the Academy of Music

Nicholas Masters as the ghost of the Commendatore and Elliot Madore as Don
Giovanni in DON GIOVANNI at the Academy of Music | photo by Kelly and Massa

As the rake himself, baritone Elliot Madore’s performance brought the audience to its feet at curtain call. That might have been because he was tasked to play a Giovanni beyond redemption, one whose need is nearly pathological, a need that forces him to couple with old women, fat women, and even smelly homeless women. Madore had exceptional acting skills and plenty of swagger. However, his voice lacked sufficient power to be heard over the too-boisterous orchestra at times. That being said, through the delivery of Giovanni’s “Champagne Aria,” Madore proved himself a  master of precision. I would love to see Madore perform with stronger direction and a real chance to sing with a controlled orchestra. (Try Glimmerglass Festival, Elliot!)

Wes Mason as Masetto and Cecilia Hall as Zerlina in DON GIOVANNI at the  Academy of Music |photo by Kelly and Massa

Wes Mason as Masetto and Cecilia Hall as Zerlina in DON GIOVANNI at the Academy of Music |photo by Kelly and Massa

The roles of Zerlina and Masetto were performed and sung well, with Wes Mason as Masetto edging out Cecelia Hall’s performance as Zerlina. Mason was ideal as the tortured groom, outclassed and outfoxed by a conniving, sociopathic cavalier. Mason was funny and charismatic as the wounded  hours-old husband of a nearly faithless bride. Hall sang beautifully but lacked an essential sensuality as Zerlina. It’s understandable when a country girl  becomes conflicted and is tempted to stray when seduced by a gentleman. I wanted Hall to succumb to either her boorish husband or her manipulative seducer with abandon, but much to my chagrin, neither happened.

Joseph Barron was a sturdy and entertaining Leporello. But the role gets loads of show-stealing assistance from both the score and the libretto. All Leporellos take advantage of this largesse though Barron, unfortunately, didn’t seize the opportunity to be a Leporello for the ages.

Despite this reviewer’s perceptions of its artistic limitations. the matinee audience gave the show a standing ovation–well deserved by the performers but an unearned gratuity for the director.

Don Giovanni continues through May 4 at the Academy of Music.

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